8 reasons why this exam is so popular among the graduates

ssc.nic.in, ssc cgl results, ssc cgl, ssc exam, ssc cgl 2016, ssc results, cgle, govt job, govt job safe, staff selection commission, latest govt job, latest ssc exam, education news, indian expressCentral government jobs are secure and recession proof

We know how much people keep a tap on latest government jobs, especially at the graduate level. While a government job helps building a stable career, it is also loaded with responsibilities.

Staff Selection Commission (SSC) is a Government of India organisation involved in recruiting staff at multiple levels in various ministries and Central Government departments, including their subordinate offices. Every year, the commission conducts a graduate level exam, commonly known as SSC CGL. This exam is one of the most coveted and sought after exams in the country.

As per the official figures, in 2015, as many as 17,86,047 candidates attempted this exam. Such a huge number merits the thought as what makes this exam so popular among graduate job seekers? Why should a candidate attempt this exam, when there are so many other career options to choose from?

Why take SSC CGL exam?

For most people, getting into a job seems like the obvious thing to do after completion of graduation. However, the top reasons for opting for SSC CGL are as follows:

1. Job safety: Central government jobs are secure and recession proof. The Indian government is seen as a stable employer, unlike many private sector establishments, where hire and fire work culture is there. Job prospects in public sector are relatively unaffected by the demand and supply forces prevailing in the job market.

2. Financial stability: Working in a government job comes with complete financial stability. The government is not expected to default on salary payments that are due to its employees. The payments are made on time and one does not have to worry about the salary not getting credited into the account.

3. Salary increments: Pay commissions regularly review the salary structure offered to Central Government workforce. Salaries in public sector go up, whenever the recommendations of a pay commission are implemented. In the recent past, these recommendations have been employee-friendly, thereby making Central Government jobs even more lucrative.

Read: Funny things people did during job interviews

4. Timely promotions: Seniority is a crucial factor in Central Government promotion policy. Due importance is given to the time that one has spent in the job. Employees get fairly rewarded on the basis of the experience they possess.

5. Work-Life balance: Cracking SSC CGL ensures that you will get into a job which offers wonderful work-life balance. Unlike the private sector, wherein performance on the job is of utmost importance, a Central Government job gives you ample time for personal enrichment.

6. Equal opportunities: Central Government is an equal opportunity employer in the real sense. It does not discriminate on the basis of caste, creed religion, ethnicity or any other parameter. The recruitments made are seen to be by and large transparent. One has to prove one’s merit in a competitive exam in order to get selected.

7. Social status: A person employed in Central Government enjoys a dignified standing in society. A lot of candidates attempt SSC CGL as they are not just after a well paying job but after the social esteem associated with the post. For many candidates taking SSC CGL is the first step towards their dream of becoming a gazetted officer some day.

8. Career progression: SSC keeps conducting grade-wise departmental competitive exams for existing Central Government staff members. This provides them with ample growth prospects. Superior performance in these exams can set a person on a path of accelerated career progression.

As more and more job seekers enter the job market, it seems the popularity of SSC CGL examination, can only increase further. Thus, if you are a probable SSC exam aspirant, it is best to get started as soon as possible.

HRD drops key clauses in re-worked IIM bill

 

These recommendations have finally been incorporated in the latest version of the IIM Bill, which has now gone to the Law ministry before being taken to Cabinet again, highly placed sources confirmed to ET.These recommendations have finally been incorporated in the latest version of the IIM Bill, which has now gone… Read More
NEW DELHI: Under fire from the Prime Minister’s Office on the issue, the Human Resource Development Ministry under its new minister has finally reworked the IIM Bill to drop key provisions, including the office of the Visitor for IIMs.

The reworked Bill has gone for final vetting to the Law Ministry before being taken to Cabinetagain. Changing its position from the Smriti Irani era, the HRD ministry under Prakash Javadekar is learnt to have agreed to completely do away with the office of the Visitor to the IIMs—putting an end to the row with thePMO on government control over IIMs.

The ministry may minimise government control over the IIM Coordination Panel but will make a special provisions to ensure government policies like that on faculty quota are followed by IIMs.

While the IIM Bill had been moved to Cabinet in August, certain new recommendations were made again asking for reworking the Bill.

These recommendations have finally been incorporated in the latest version of the IIM Bill, which has now gone to the Law ministry before being taken to Cabinet again, highly placed sources confirmed to ET.

All major centrally—funded institutes, including IITs and Central Universities have the President of India as the Visitor.

The Visitor makes top appointments at these institutes and is also empowered to hold an inquiry into an institute or its head’s functioning. Since the Visitor is largely advised by the ministry in his decisions related to educational institutes, many argue that this this only serves as an indirect way for exercising government control and influence over IIMs.

While agreeing on some of the other proposals by the PMO for allowing greater autonomy to IIMs, the HRD ministry under Irani had insisted on retaining the Visitorial role.

Govt to give more autonomy to IIMs

NEW DELHI: The HRD ministry has decided to give more autonomy to the Indian Institutes of Management (IIM) and reduce government control over them under a proposed Bill, with Union minister Prakash Javadekar reworking the provisions introduced under his predecessor Smriti Irani.

According to sources, among the key provisions that the HRD ministry has decided to revise include those related to the Visitor’s office.

It is learnt that the new Bill draft has dropped previous references to the President having the power to review their work as the Visitor.

Another change from the earlier proposed draft is that the HRD ministry has given more powers to the Board of Governors of the IIMs to appoint their directors.

It is understood that the HRD ministry under Irani did not favour some of these changes, but with the PMO apparently supportive of more autonomy, her successor Javadekar has accepted them.

The new draft bill is now learnt to have gone to the Law ministry for vetting.

Among other provisions which have been changed relate to minimising government control over IIM coordination panel, the sources said.

FTII to propose fee hike, age limit; students oppose

 

PUNE: The administration of Film & Television Institute of India (FTII) here would be proposing a fee hike and upper age-limit of 25 years for admissions at Friday’s meeting of its academic council in Mumbai.

But the proposal has not gone down well with a group of students who said the administration was trying to earn “profit” and make the institute “commercial”.

“The rationale behind proposing hike in fee structure is that for five years the fees were not increased as they should have been. In fact, in 2010, the fee of acting course, which is self-financing, was Rs 1.75 lakh (per annum) however, the then administration brought it down to Rs 48,000,” said the FTII director Bhupendra Kainthola.

“Ideally, the fee of each course should be increased by 10 per cent every year, however no attempt to revise fees was made in the past and CAG audit passed strictures that the fees at FTII were irrational,” he said.

For the acting course, the administration was going to propose the fee of Rs 3.40 lakh per annum he said.

The fees of the four specialised courses — direction, cinematography, editing and sound recording — was earlier Rs 33,000 and over the years it was marginally increased to Rs 48,000, he said.

“Ideally, if 10 per cent hike is effected every year, the fee for these courses should be Rs 64,000,” Kainthola said.

FTII had studied the fee structures of other institutes such as the National School of Drama and National Institute of Design before finalising the proposal, he said.

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How to prepare for Maths in competitive exams

JEE, upsc, how to prepare maths, ibps, ssc, bank po, CAT, GMAT, maths for ssc exam, banking exam, maths tough, education news, indian expressInstead of actual calculations always believe in mental calculations, rounding off and avoid doing rough work

Although it is with every subject that one must have abundant clarity and understanding before appearing for an exam at any stage of life but with Mathematics the level required notches up just a bit.

Since there is a level of competition involved in prestigious examinations like CAT, GMAT, Bank PO’s, Staff Selection Commission, the candidate needs to have a proper strategy to score well in this subject.

In any competition examination, quantitative section constitutes roughly around half of the question paper – directly or indirectly. It may include questions ranging from arithmetic to algebra to geometry to data interpretation to data sufficiency. No examination is deemed to be complete without a major role of quantitative section. Thus, whether you like the subject or not, you cannot ignore Mathematics if you are to appear for a Competition Examination!!

How to deal with the quantitative section

While all the questions may not require advance knowledge of mathematics, conceptual clarity of basics of Mathematics learnt at school level and the tricks to quickly solve questions are something one can’t certainly do without.

Knowing mathematics is different from understanding mathematics. While preparing for the examinations, if the questions have actually been solved by hand and not just read with solutions, you definitely stand a better chance to solve the same more quickly in the exams when it matters the most.

Thus, the first and the only mantra to have a perfect grip over the subject is practice more.

Most of the competition examinations these days have negative marking too. Thus, for students, it turns out to be a two front battle — to solve the maximum number of questions in the least possible time and to solve them correctly. To achieve the twin target one surely needs to ensure to memorise basic formulae/ methods. Also, never attempt to answer a question in first go if you are not 100 per cent sure.

Some of the tips for an efficient problem solving and good results in quantitative section are below:

General quantitative questions

— Memorise squares up to 35, cubes up to 15 and prime numbers up to 150;
— Memorise numerical tables up to 20;
— Remember percentage related fractions up to 1/12 (e.g. 50% = 1/2, 25% = ¼ and so on)
— While sitting in the exam, never pressurise yourself with time factor during initial stages – try to reach the last question within 25-35 per cent of the time scheduled for quantitative section after continuously ticking approximately 50 per cent of the total number of questions
— Memorise shortcuts and discuss them with friends to have perfection

 

— Prefer applying hit and trial methods – wherever possible – before you think of actual working. Some questions can in fact be solved by elimination of choices. Work smartly to all such questions.
— Right from the day you begin preparing for the exam, start making your own notes for short cuts;
— Practice to solve by oral working of calculations as it saves time;
— Emphasise more on high scoring chapters;
— Memorise area formulae for 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional figures;
— Focus on algebraic and Indices formulae;
— Remember important T-ratios (in Trigonometry) and their values;
— Remember Pythagoras Triplets.

Data interpretation questions

— Always glance the data with its units (viz. meter, day, kg, lakhs, etc)
— Have a bird’s eye view of what it contains and swings around;
— Keep a watch on the answer choices – if wider – only then think of rounding and ball park thinking else get down to do the detailed working as per the question demand;
— Rounding should be done with justifications and should look genuine and proportionate;
— Instead of actual calculations always believe in mental calculations, rounding off and avoid doing rough work and
— If any rough work is done, it should be kept a track off so that it is revisited for subsequent questions.

 

Data sufficiency questions

— Never presume or suppose anything other than the information at hand;
— You need not solve the problem actually. Your job is to simply observe whether the problem can be solved or not and a definite result be reached or not with the information available;
— Learn the basic concepts on number systems, inequalities, geometry, equations for ease in data sufficiency roblem solving;
— During practice, actually solve the questions so that it can be easily recalled during the examination.

How should non-engineering students prepare for the exam

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How should non-engineers prepare for the Common Admission Test (CAT)? It is a genuine query of roughly 40 per cent of the candidates who belong to non-engineering backgrounds.

In general, there is no difference in the strategy and on the focus area between engineering and non-engineering students. There is a high number of non-engineering students every year who manage to crack CAT, in spite of not being from an engineering/statistics/maths/mathematical science background. Thus, such preconceived notions are completely absurd.

To succeed, kill such wrong notions first. How a student performs in the exam like CAT has less to do with his/her background and more to do with his/her perseverance and being open to fresh ideas.

 

One should draw a boundary between QA and Maths. CAT demands only basic mathematical skills that we have learnt till class 10. CAT does not focus on theoretical ideas but application of basic concepts. This essentially means that your knowledge of basic arithmetic and proportionality tools, numbers, time-speed distance, elementary combinatorics, algebra and geometry is more than enough to help you crack the test.

Most of the problems present a level ground for everyone so there isn’t much of an advantage that engineers or other ‘maths people’ have. Most students get carried away and end up focussing on ‘glamorous’ concepts while neglecting simpler ones.

 

Basic mathematical skill is just one dimension of the QA section and the other dimensions are more important. These are: The ability to perform in a pressure situation, observational skills, decision making, adaptability/flexibility and finally, an ability to comprehend the questions.

Solving a CAT quant problem is a step wise process and the basic algorithm is as follows –

Step-I: Comprehension of question

Step-II: Interpretation, that is, what is given and what is required etc

Step-III: Problem solving (If required)

Before moving to step III, however, one should explore all the possibilities of answer option elimination through various approaches such as observation or through finding out the range of guesstimate values after analysing the extreme cases. To inculcate the above set of skills, one needs to practice hard.

 

DI and LR are less knowledge-oriented and more skill-oriented. These areas involve fewer concepts and require regular practice. Practicing under time pressure is important. Whether you are an engineer or a non-engineer, this section is an equalizer in the true sense.

To excel in DI one should be conversant with the application of some of the most repeated tools related to percentages, proportionality tool, averages and alligations. Students should be clear with “how interpretation is different from calculations” and “how one can avoid unnecessary calculations in DI”.

In calculation-based DI questions, if you can calculate mentally it will be an advantage. Judicious use of on-screen calculator also saves precious time.

 

In short, the adage, practice makes one perfect is absolutely true for DI. Apart from this comprehension ability, logical reasoning and application of maxima-minima concepts is required more in reasoning based DI.

To deal with LR puzzles based upon linear arrangements, circular arrangements, distributions, order & sequencing, selections or binary logic, an aspirant is required to achieve the basic skill set though rigorous practice.

The three basic skill sets are comprehension, interpretation and case analysis which are essentially required to crack any puzzle. After achieving the basic skill sets of puzzles some topic based on LR such as cubes, games, venn diagram, tournaments etc are also required in this section.

 

Non-engineering students need to focus more upon the evaluating factors in CAT, that is, optimization of speed and accuracy. Prepare for the exam by dividing your time equally for VA, LRDI and Quant sections.

Wish you all the best!

– This article has been written by Pradeep Kumar Pandey, Senior Regional Head, T.I.M.E.

Bacopa Monnieri benefits in enhancing memory and reducing stress

In ancient times, when there were no synthetic or modern medicines, people did fall ill and many a times they were cured with the help of herb extracts. This form of medicine, referred to as the traditional medicines is still prevalent in many countries, particularly Asia and Africa. That means even today, the extracts of medicinal plants are used to make medicines. One such well-known herb is Bacopa Monnieri, known as ‘Brahmi’ in Asia, particularly in India. Brahmi means herb of grace and it was called so because it was found to bring relief to those suffering from anxiety disorders. Though it will not be able to procure extracts from the plant now, there are many manufacturers who are using the extract to formulate various beneficial Bacopa Monnieri supplements, which are available even online.

Image result for Bacopa Monnieri benefits in enhancing memory and reducing stress

How can Bacopa Monnieri help you

Most of the health supplements that are available today are made from chemicals which are made in labs and while some of them may be useful, they may also bring about various side effects. But when it comes to Bacopa Monnieri supplements, they are made using the extracts of the plant and that is why they are so beneficial as they bring to you all the benefits of Bacopa Monnieri, something that has been in medical use since centuries.

Bacopa extracts can help enhance memory levels, and bring about calmness and thus very beneficial in treating anxiety disorders. One of the best advantages of using Bacopa extracts is that it can better the function of brain.

There have also been many research studies on Bacopa extracts that vouch for its health benefits such as preventing memory loss, relieving stress, enhancing mood and bringing about calmness. That is in India, you also get Brahmi hair oil.  It can also regulate two important hormones in the body such as serotonin and dopamine which are responsible for mental energy. Bacopa extracts thus can bring about mood enhancement and lessen stress and bring about joy which is possible when serotonin and dopamine levels are controlled.

Bacopa Monnieri extracts have Bacoside A in large amounts which are very beneficial in enhancing the function of nerve cell receptors which promotes communication in the brain, thus helping in enhancing memory and this can also be helpful in alleviating memory loss in longer run.

Apart from many reasons that can induce ameliorating oxidative stress, there are also chemical reactions in brain that cause stress. Bacopa extracts can bring down these chemical reactions by regulating the levels of HSP70, a stress stimulator. This not only helps in alleviating stress levels but also reduces anxiety attacks and at the same time, enhancing memory as well.

By taking appropriate dosage of Bacopa Monnieri extracts supplements, you can get many health benefits. The side effects can be very rare and mild if these supplements are taken as per the prescribed recommendations. Anxiety disorders and stress are common ailments faced by many and instead of taking pills, these natural supplements can bring about speedy effect minus side effects.

SC stays admission at Theni agri college

Image result for SC stays admission at Theni agri collegeThe Supreme Court has granted an interim stay on the Madras high court’s order to allow College of Agricultural Technology (CAT), Theni, to fill its full quota of 120 seats.

Sree Krishna Educational Trust got approval from Government of Tamil Nadu to start the agricultural college for offering four year degree course (BSc in agricultural science) for 60 students by a government order dated June 21, 2010, issued by the agriculture department subject to affiliation by Tamil Nadu Agricultural University (TNAU) and fulfillment of its conditions within six months.

Subsequently, provisional affiliation was granted to the college in July 7, 2010, for admitting 60 students. A provisional approval was granted by TNAU for increase of students from 60 to 120 on June 20, 2011, for the academic year 2011-2012, as a special case, subject to the college abiding by the university’s infrastructure and other facilities within six months.

After the university’s standing committee inspected the college after four academic years, it issued a report in June 2016, saying the seats had to be reduced from 120 to 60 as the infrastructure facility available was only 41.31% out of 100%. As the college did not reply to the report, the next month TNAU decided to reduce strength to 60. The academic council also approved of the recommendation.

 

The same month, the trust moved the Madras high court (Madurai bench), which, in a single judge order on August 5, 2016, set aside the university’s direction to reduce the seats, and ordered it to take final decision within six weeks.

 

The high court, in its order, said the university had “successfully frustrated” the procedure to admit rest of the 60 students. Despite knowing the final date of admission was August 31, it still did not take a final decision. Issuing a showcause notice to the university authorities the court said, why the university be not proceeded under the contempt of court Act, along with a fine of 25 lakh for denying admission to students. Passing interim orders, it granted provisional admission to the remaining students.

 

The trust then filed an appeal in the Madras high court saying the university had not yet taken a final decision, and was “bidding time.” A division bench said despite knowing the final date of admission was August 31, it still did not take a final decision. Issuing a show-cause to the university authorities the court said, why the university be not proceeded under the contempt of court Act, along with imposition of a fine of Rs 25 lakh for denying admission to students. Passing interim orders, it granted provisional admission to the remaining students.

 

TNAU then moved the apex court. Advocate General Mukul Rohtagi appeared on the behalf of TNAU. A bench of Justice Dipak Mishra and Justice C Nagappan then granted interim stay on the Madras high court’s order.

Recalling 1975 order only way for IIM faculty quota?

 

Representative image.

NEW DELHI: The dominant view in many IIMs is that the only way to resolve the demand for reservations in faculties in the premier institutes could be through the withdrawal of the 1975 HRD ministry order that exempted them from having quotas.
One IIM director said, “We are bound by the 1975 order. There has been no other order from HRD ministry invalidating exemption from reservation to SCs/STs/OBCs.” He said, the 1975 order was first issued in 1974 for School of Planning & Architecture giving it exemption from reservation in teaching jobs. The order said SPA being a technical education institute, it is being allowed an exemption.

“It is for the HRD ministry to find out how an order meant for technical institutes was extended to IIMs that were management institutes,” one IIM director said putting the blame on the ministry for creating confusion. In 1975, an exemption was given to IIM Ahmedabad and soon other IIMs adopted it.

IIM directors also point out that withdrawal of 1975 order cannot be done in haste. “If the order was issued after a Cabinet decision, then HRD will have to seek Cabinet approval. It is not going to be easy,” one director said, adding that it also needs to be found out what was the policy before 1975. Even if the proposed IIM bill allows reservation in faculty jobs, the earlier order has to be withdrawn, points out an IIM director.

On its part, HRD ministry is maintaining silence. “Our strategy will be known soon,” one official said.

FTII to propose fee hike, age limit of 25 years for admissions; students oppose

FTII, Film & Television Institute of India, FTII admissions, FTII fee hike, FTII admissions, FTII admissions age limit, FTII administration, Bhupendra Kainthola, India news, education newsStudents staged a protest outside the FTII Director’s office, accusing the administration of turning the institute into a commercial place to earn profit. (Source: File)

The administration of Film & Television Institute of India (FTII) here would be proposing a fee hike and upper age-limit of 25 years for admissions at Friday’s meeting of its academic council in Mumbai.

But the proposal has not gone down well with a group of students who said the administration was trying to earn “profit” and make the institute “commercial”.

“The rationale behind proposing hike in fee structure is that for five years the fees were not increased as they should have been. In fact, in 2010, the fee of acting course, which is self-financing, was Rs 1.75 lakh (per annum) however, the then administration brought it down to Rs 48,000,” said the FTII director Bhupendra Kainthola.

 

“Ideally, the fee of each course should be increased by 10 per cent every year, however no attempt to revise fees was made in the past and CAG audit passed strictures that the fees at FTII were irrational,” he said.

For the acting course, the administration was going to propose the fee of Rs 3.40 lakh p.a. he said.

The fees of the four specialised courses –- direction, cinematography, editing and sound recording — was earlier Rs 33,000 and over the years it was marginally increased to Rs 48,000, he said.

“Ideally, if 10 per cent hike is effected every year, the fee for these courses should be Rs 64,000,” Kainthola said.

FTII had studied the fee structures of other institutes such as the National School of Drama and National Institute of Design before finalising the proposal, he said.

Kainthola said at present there was no upper age limit for admissions, and a proposal to fix it at 25 years would be tabled in Friday’s meeting.

Institutes such as NSD and NID have upper age limit for admission, the FTII director said.

“There is also a proposal to increase the hostel fees,” he said.

Students had expressed reservations, he said, adding that “they have two students’ representatives at the academic council, so they can present their view in the meeting”.

Meanwhile, a group of students on Thursday staged a protest outside the Director’s office, accusing the administration of turning the institute into a commercial place to earn the profit and keeping the students from the poor background away from the cinema.

“The idea of FTII was never to earn profit. India being a welfare state, where education is right, by increasing the fees irrationally you are keeping certain class of the society away from the cinema and film making,” said Yashaswi Mishra of FTII Students Association.

“The administration is citing reasons that they have not increased the fees for a long time, they are actually talking the language of profitability and sending a clear message that if you have the money, then (only) you can learn cinema.”

He also criticised the proposal to fix the upper age limit at 25. “It is an irrational decision for an art institute and we students will fight it till end,” he said.

FSA also criticised the administration for holding the meeting of academic council in Mumbai instead of at FTII premises.

FTII had witnessed a prolonged strike of students last year against the appointment of BJP member and TV actor Gajendra Chauhan as its chairman.